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Get your tickets now for the 2019 Liberty Dinner

The NHLA Liberty Dinner will be held on Saturday, July 13, 2019 at Grappone Conference Center, 70 Constitution Ave, Concord, NH 03301. This year’s theme is “Taxation is Theft”!
Attend this event to be among the first to see the 2019 Liberty Rating!

At the cocktail reception beginning at 6pm, you can schmooze with the NHLA board, our esteemed legislators, and other NHLA members. There will be a cash bar at your service and hors d’oeuvres will be provided.

Join us for a plated dinner beginning at 7pm (with choice of beef, fish or vegetarian entree), dessert, and a cash bar. Legislators and Full or Lifetime members receive reduced pricing.
We will also award the Activist of the Year and the Legislator of the Year!

Our featured speaker, Dan Mitchell, will give the keynote address “Taxes: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”. Dan Mitchell is Chairman of the Center for Freedom and Prosperity, a pro-market public policy organization he founded in 2000. His major research interests include tax reform, international tax competition, the economic burden of government spending, and other fiscal policy issues.

Stay with us after dinner as we unveil our 2019 Liberty Ratings and announce our silent auction and raffle winners!

Tickets can be purchased here.

New Hampshire State House Bicentennial

The next time you visit the New Hampshire State House it will be 200 years old. The current State House opened its doors on June 2, 1819. There will be commemorative events all week, including opening ceremonies and tours this Sunday afternoon. On Thursday, there is a joint session and picnic honoring all legislators, current and former. If you plan on attending Thursday and you are not a current representative, please consider parking at the Everett Arena and take a shuttle bus to the State House. Also, there are some very interesting original documents on display such as an 1789 copy of the bill of rights (with all 12 of the articles!).

For more details, see the full schedule at the link below.

2019 Mid-Term Legislator Scores

The following data is a mid-term score for each representative and senator based on pro-liberty and anti-liberty roll call votes through crossover. It represents a simplified version of the scoring that is completed at the end of the session. Votes in this report are unweighted with regard to the liberty impact of each bill and no adjustments have been made for pro- or anti-liberty bill sponsorship. As is the case with the final Liberty Rating, missed roll call votes negatively impact the score regardless of whether an absence was excused or not.

2019 Mid Term Scores

2019-mid-term-scores.pdf

Bylaws Change 2019-03-27

DRAFT BYLAWS CHANGE 3/27/2019

This proposed bylaws change for the NHLA was submitted by member, Alvin S., of Loudon, NH on February 28, 2019. The board voted to move this change to membership on Sunday, March 3rd. The vote was 6-0 with one abstention.

Purpose: Prevent a winner by virtue of a single write-in, in the event that no other candidates are nominated.

Amend NHLA Bylaws, Article Three, paragraph 3.6 and add new paragraph 3.6.2 as follows:

(Additions are in bold.)

3.6 Any member eligible to vote may become a Director, and may nominate any member eligible to vote to fill a vacant Directorship. Directors will be elected by a simple majority vote but must receive at least ten (10) votes to be elected. All members eligible to vote shall have the option of submitting ballots via mail or electronically. Board vacancies must be filled within a reasonable period. The exact terms of the election may be decided by Board resolution, in accordance with these Bylaws. Where ballots allow for write-in candidates, the ballot shall have a notice that write-in candidates must also meet the ten (10) vote minimum.

3.6.2 If there is a tie vote or if no candidate receives the minimum of ten (10) votes, the board may, by unanimous motion, resolve the tie, elect a candidate who received fewer than ten (10) votes, or call for a new election. A call for a new election would require a simple majority vote.

[End of amendment]

Note: 10 votes corresponds with about 3.5% of voting-eligible members. Since we use “approval voting” there is no possibility of unintentional vote splitting.

Make Your Activism for Liberty a Habit

Activism for Liberty has a definite purpose. That is to bring about political and societal change in the direction of more individual freedom. It isn’t merely the act of telling people our opinions. It involves action with the intent of influencing others toward greater awareness, understanding, and practice of the principles of Liberty. Here are some suggestions for becoming a more effective liberty activist.

Work to your strengths

Engage in some quiet self-reflection and decide what skills you already possess that you can put to good use. Do you have good writing skills? Consider writing a letter to the editor (LTEs) of the local newspaper, contribute content to the NHLA website, or start a blog. Are you good at analysis? Try reviewing bills with the NHLA’s bill review system. Are you good at software development? Consider working with the NHLA’s IT development team to build new tools for other activists. Do you have good interpersonal communication skills? Perhaps you could work on a phone banking campaign to affect legislation or on a door knocking campaign for a candidate. Are you good at event planning? You could help plan a gathering of activists for a specific purpose, such as a rally, protest, or our annual Liberty Dinner awards event. There are lots of ways to put your existing skills to good use.

Work on skills you’d like to cultivate

Maybe you aren’t naturally good at public speaking but want to become so. Consider joining a Toastmasters group where you can practice your speaking skills among a friendly audience. Perhaps you’d like to understand how the legislative process works in Concord. Try attending a few committee sessions at the State House and observing how citizens or lobbyists structure and frame their testimony or the way a committee deliberates on the merits of a bill. You’ll quickly develop ideas for how to present testimony yourself. If you’d like to develop skills specifically for managing campaigns or issues-based advocacy, consider taking a training course such as the Grassroots Leadership Academy. Think about one or more skills you’d like to build and create a routine that allows you to practice them while learning from mentors who have mastered the skill before you.

“Goldilocks zone” of activity

We see some common patterns among the activist community. Some activists are hard-charging out of the gate but end up becoming disillusioned because they don’t see progress happen as quickly as they might like. Some push their personal limits for too long and experience burnout and so stop all activity. Others may want to be more involved but put off taking the initiative and stay stuck in their current routines.

Try to find your personal “Goldilocks zone” of action; not too little, not too much, but just the right amount. Enough that activism is part of your weekly or monthly routine, but not too much that you’re unable to sustain your desired level of activity. After all, you still have to balance your other responsibilities and personal relationships in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. How many hours a month can you invest in advancing Liberty in New Hampshire?

Make it fun

Activism doesn’t have to be dull and boring. If you’re engaged in activities that you enjoy, it won’t seem burdensome. Combining social activity with performing a clearly defined task can make the experience more fulfilling. Also, try inviting others to participate with you and make it a group effort with people whose company you enjoy. Employing the buddy system with just one other person can keep you both motivated to be consistent and persistent.

Take initiative

We humans are creatures of habit. Sometimes we get stuck in our routines or within our online echo chambers, and we may feel reluctant to venture out and engage with the wider world. Being a more effective activist requires us to step outside of our comfort zone and engage with members of the legislature and the voting public.

By making our Activism for Liberty a Habit, with small incremental improvements through practice, we’ll all make steady progress in becoming more effective and persuasive activists. Doing this together as a community of like-minded people can have a historic effect on the future of Liberty in New Hampshire.

If you’d like to become more involved with the NHLA, email volunteer@nhliberty.org for more information.

 

Bylaws Change 2019-02-24

DRAFT BYLAWS CHANGE 2/24/2019

Purpose:

A) Remove Development Director position

B) Add ability to hire independent contractors.

 

A) Remove Development Director position

Article Three – Board of Directors

3.2 The Board will consist of eight seven Directors: a Chairman, a Director of Development, a Director of Political Action, a Director of Membership, a Director of Research, a Director of Information Technology (IT), a Secretary and a Treasurer. Specific duties may be assigned to each Director by majority vote of the Board.

3.5.1 Starting in December 2017, the term of office for each board position shall expire as follows: Odd years: April 30th: chairman, secretary; November 30th: political action, treasurer. Even years: April 30th: membership, IT; November 30th: development, research.

Article Four – Officers

4.8 The duties of the Director of Development shall include, but not be limited to: soliciting donations from individuals and organizations; managing donor relations; organizing the annual Liberty Dinner.

Article Five – Committees

5.2 The Ways and Means Committee shall be responsible for raising the funds necessary for the NHLA to fulfill its mission of advancing the cause of individual liberty in New Hampshire. The Director of Development shall be the chair of this committee.

5.3 5.2 The Public Relations Committee shall be responsible for communicating with the media and the public in a manner consistent with the directives set forth by the Board. The Secretary shall be the chair of this committee.

5.4 5.3 The Information Technology Committee shall be responsible for fulfilling the needs of the organization as they relate to technology, as determined by the Board. The Director of IT shall be the chair of this committee.

5.5 5.4 The Research Committee shall be responsible for writing policy briefs and proposed legislation in furtherance of the purpose of the NHLA, for distribution to the media and elected representatives, as directed by the Board. The Director of Research shall be the chair of this committee.

5.6 5.5 The Civic Action Committee shall consist of all members of the Board of Directors and their designees and shall be responsible for finding appropriate NH residents to receive financial assistance through our Civic Action Fund and scheduling charitable events throughout the year to bring non-governmental assistance to NH residents. The Membership Director shall be the chair of this committee.

 

B) Add ability to hire independent contractors

Article Six – Independent Contractors (New Section)

6.1 An independent contractor may be engaged to accomplish specific tasks or duties and whose engagement would meet 1099 IRS reporting requirements.

6.2 The board shall have the authority by a simple majority to retain or discharge the services of an independent contractor.

6.3 The board shall develop, and approve by simple majority, a well-defined scope of duties before establishing a position and must advertise the position.

6.5 The board shall approve by simple majority any compensation, commissions, expense reimbursement policy, board oversight processes, and/or reporting requirements for the position. These requirements may be defined by the board and negotiated with applicants but must ultimately be approved by the board.

6.6 No independent contractor may be a voting member of the board.

6.7 Independent contractors will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

Article Six Seven – Dissolution

6 7.1 Should the NHLA dissolve, all remaining assets shall be distributed in a manner advancing the purpose of the organization.

Article Seven Eight – Amendments

7 8.1 These Bylaws may be amended with the approval of four-fifths of the Directors, provided that at a prior meeting such amendments were approved by a majority of the Directors, and that these amendments were distributed to all Directors for review, and made available to the members on the website and in an email newsletter, in the interim between meetings.

7 8.2 Any Bylaws changes shall take effect at the close of the Board meeting at which they are ratified.

Article Eight Nine – Conflict

8 9.1 If there is any conflict between the provisions of these Bylaws and the Articles of Incorporation of the NHLA, the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation shall govern. Should any of the provisions of portions of these Bylaws be held unenforceable or invalid for any reason, the remaining provisions and portions of these Bylaws shall be unaffected by such holding.

Building Alliances: Who and How

Achieving liberty is a matter of degrees. We won’t have a utopia tomorrow, however much we want it. What we can do is push back to regain our freedom and to stop attempts to take more of it away. This requires finding allies, even if they don’t agree with us on everything. After all, this is the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance, and we don’t even agree with each other on everything!

This doesn’t mean that everyone who agrees with you is a useful ally. You have to weigh several factors. Some “allies” turn out to be liabilities. Others are valuable, even if you have to fight them tooth and nail on other issues. Here are some questions to ask yourself when trying to decide.

Are they honest? This is essential. Honest people give their reasons for the positions they take, and they believe the arguments which they offer. Someone who uses misinformation to help the cause is a liability. Someone who claims to agree with you just to get your support is a danger. It’s legitimate to adapt your arguments to your audience, but people who change their positions depending on whom they’re talking to don’t deserve your trust.

Are they trying to use you? Of course they are, up to a point. They want your support, just as you want theirs. But if they’re endorsing a position you advocate just to get your support, that’s not a productive alliance. You need allies who sincerely believe in what they say they support. Their reasons might be different from yours, but you need some real common ground.

How do they argue their points? Some people set out to be provocative. Done well, that’s a useful strategy. It gets attention. Done badly, it discredits the position you’re trying to advance. Others are just incoherent or unintentionally antagonistic. You may be able to get them to improve their line of argument, but until they do, they can make your side look foolish.

What other issues do they drag in? Allies will hold positions you don’t like, but the question here is whether they constantly bring them in while working with you. For instance, if someone wants to ally with you on limiting property taxes but regularly says the way to do it is by creating an income tax, that’s not going to be a productive alliance.

How do they reflect on you? You can work with people of many persuasions, but some are so out of bounds that just the fact of working with them means trouble. In those cases, it doesn’t matter how reasonable they seem to be when you talk with them. Avowed Marxists and white supremacists fall into this category.

Every alliance is a two-way street. Other people who share some positions with you are thinking about whether you’d be an asset or a liability. If you think they can be valuable allies, make sure you’re a worthwhile ally for them. Be open about your own views. Be the best advocate you can be. Respect any boundaries you agree to. Then there’s a decent chance your collaboration will be a productive one. You may even win them over to some more of your views.

Bylaws Change 2018-11-29

DRAFT BYLAWS CHANGE 11/29/2018

Purpose: Remove Development Director and add ability to hire independent contractors.

 

NHLA Bylaws

Article One – Name and Purpose

1.1 The organization shall be called the “New Hampshire Liberty Alliance (NHLA).”

1.2 The NHLA is organized primarily for the purpose of accepting contributions and making expenditures to influence the selection, nomination, election, or appointment of individuals who are favorable to liberty to state or local public office. The NHLA is dedicated to effecting political and cultural change in New Hampshire in a manner favorable to individual liberty.

1.3 The principal address of the organization shall always be in New Hampshire. The specific town and address are to be set by the Directors.

1.4 The NHLA may also have offices at such other places, within or without its state of incorporation, where it is qualified to do business, as its business and activities may require, and as the Board of Directors may, from time to time, designate.

Article Two – Members

2.1 Any person may submit their name, email address, and mailing address to the board of the NHLA for the express purpose of being counted as a Basic member, signifying that he or she supports the goals and purposes of the organization.

2.1.1 Membership information shall be held in the strictest confidentiality. Only the Board of Directors, and technical staff directly authorized by the Board of Directors, shall have access to membership information. The NHLA shall not knowingly sell or distribute specific member data. Aggregate membership information, such as the total number of members, may be distributed at the discretion of the Board of Directors.

2.1.2 Memberships shall be for the term of two years. At the end of each member’s term, he or she shall be contacted and asked to renew his or her membership.

2.1.3 There will be an annual meeting of the NHLA membership.

2.1.4 A member may be removed from the NHLA if at least 2/3 of the Board of Directors vote to remove that member. 2.1.5 Membership fees may be paid in US Dollars or an equivalent thereof.

2.2 Basic membership in the NHLA shall always be free.

2.2.1 Basic membership shall entitle an individual to receive electronic newsletters and bulletins from the NHLA.

2.3 Full membership in the NHLA shall be an additional paid level of membership.

2.3.1 Full membership shall be offered for a fee of not less than $40 per 2-year term.

2.3.2 Full membership in the NHLA shall entitle an individual to vote in NHLA elections.

2.4 Lifetime membership in the NHLA shall be an additional level of paid membership.

2.4.1 Lifetime membership shall be offered for a fee of not less than $200.

2.4.2 Lifetime membership shall entitle an individual to vote in NHLA elections and exempts the member from the biennial membership renewal requirement.

2.5 Additional levels of membership may be created at the discretion of the Board of Directors.

Article Three – Board of Directors

3.1 Subject to the provisions of the laws of New Hampshire and any limitations in the Articles of Incorporation and these Bylaws relating to action required or permitted to be taken or approved by the members, if any, of this corporation, the activities and affairs of this corporation shall be conducted, and all corporate powers shall be exercised by or under the direction of the Board of Directors.

3.2 The Board will consist of eight Directors: a Chairman, a Director of Development, a Director of Political Action, a Director of Membership, a Director of Research, a Director of Information Technology (IT), a Secretary and a Treasurer. Specific duties may be assigned to each Director by majority vote of the Board.

3.3 The original five Directors shall be James Maynard, Chair, of Keene, NH; Michelle Dumas, Director of Civic Action, of Somersworth, NH; Donald Gorman, Director of Political Action, of Deerfield, NH, Rich Tomasso, Director of Membership, of Nashua, NH, and Michelle Otterson, Secretary-Treasurer, of Keene, NH.

3.4 The initial terms of the Directors shall terminate as follows: the Director of Civic Action on 31 December 2004, the Director of Political Action on 31 March 2005, the Chairman on 30 June 2005, the Secretary on 30 September 2005, the Director of Membership on 31 December 2005, the Treasurer on 31 March 2006, and the Director of Research on 30 June 2006. After the initial terms of the Directors expire all terms shall be for a period of two years.

3.5 After the initial terms of the original Directors expire all terms shall be for a period of two years. Directors may serve no more than two consecutive terms on the Board, followed by a period of at least one year of non-service.

3.5.1 Starting in December 2017, the term of office for each board position shall expire as follows: Odd years: April 30th: chairman, secretary; November 30th: political action, treasurer. Even years: April 30th: membership, IT; November 30th: development, research.

3.6 Any member eligible to vote may become a Director, and may nominate any member eligible to vote to fill a vacant Directorship. Directors will be elected by simple majority vote. All members eligible to vote shall have the option of submitting ballots via mail or electronically. Board vacancies must be filled within a reasonable period. The exact terms of the election may be decided by Board resolution, in accordance with these Bylaws.

3.6.1 If only one (1) candidate for election to a vacant or expiring board position can be found, the board may, by unanimous motion, elect the candidate to the board, foregoing an election by the membership.

3.7 The Board shall meet at least twice per quarter, and if no meeting is scheduled in the next 30 days, shall meet within two weeks upon the request of any two Directors. Meetings may be held in person, via conference call, or via electronic instant messaging, and whenever possible should be open for members to observe. At least five Directors must be present to constitute a quorum. The Chairman shall be responsible for notifying the Directors of a meeting. Notification of a planned meeting, a cancellation, or of a change in the venue or date of a meeting shall be made by any two of the following methods: announcement at a meeting, posting on the NHLA website, phone, email, or mail. The first notice should

be made at least one week in advance of the meeting. The requirement for the second notification may be waived for a Director if the Chairman receives communication from that Director indicating that the first notification was received and understood.

3.8 The Directors may, at their option, elect a standing vice-chair from among themselves to fulfill the functions of the Chairman in the event of the Chairman’s absence.

3.9 Directors may only be removed by the affirmative vote of at least five of the other Directors or by voluntary resignation or clear incapacitation. Additionally, any Director who misses three consecutive Board meetings shall automatically be removed.

3.10 The method of discerning the votes of individual Directors shall be left to the Chairman. However, if any Director requests a written vote that request shall be granted. In regard to this provision an emailed vote shall suffice.

3.11 No part of the net earnings of the NHLA shall inure to the benefit of, or be distributable to, its Directors, Officers, or other private persons, except that the Board of the NHLA shall be authorized and empowered by majority vote to pay reasonable compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the purposes of the NHLA.

3.12 The Directors shall not be personally liable for the debts, liabilities, and other obligations of the NHLA. The Directors and Officers of the NHLA shall be indemnified by the NHLA to the fullest extent permissible under the laws of New Hampshire.

3.13 The Board of Directors, except as otherwise provided in these Bylaws, may by resolution authorize any Officer or agent of the NHLA to enter into any contract or execute and deliver any instrument in the name of and on behalf of the NHLA, and such authority may be general or confined to specific instances. Unless so authorized, no Officer, agent, or employee shall have any power or authority to bind the NHLA by any contract or engagement or to pledge its credit or to render it liable monetarily for any purpose or in any amount.

3.14 Except as required by law, checks, drafts, promissory notes, orders for the payment of money, and other evidence of indebtedness of the NHLA for any amount above a limit to be set by Board resolution shall be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by the Chairman of the NHLA. For amounts less than that limit the signature of the Treasurer shall suffice. The Board of Directors may accept on behalf of the NHLA any contribution, gift, bequest, or devise for the purposes of this corporation.

Article Four – Officers

4.1 The duties of the Chairman shall include, but not be limited to: setting the agenda for board meetings; presiding over such meetings; serving as an ex-officio member on all standing committees; recruiting board members; scheduling the annual meeting.

4.2 The duties of the Director of Political Action shall include, but not be limited to: recruiting candidates for state, city and town offices; training candidates; endorsing candidates for office; determining campaign donations; determining the Legislator of the Year; providing training on the legislative process; providing training for town meeting.

4.3 The duties of the Director of Membership shall include, but not be limited to: recruiting new members; retaining current members; maintaining accurate membership records and reporting such to the Board; chairing the civic action committee.

4.4 The duties of the Director of Research shall include, but not be limited to: bill review oversight; documentation of NHLA position on key legislative issues; developing the Liberty Rating for board approval; developing candidate surveys.

4.5 The duties of the Secretary shall include, but not be limited to: keeping accurate minutes of board meetings; press release distribution; mailings.

4.6 The duties of the Treasurer shall include, but not be limited to: monthly financial reports; timely deposit of all received funds and timely payment of all bona fide expenses; possession of inventoried NHLA materials (shirts, pins, membership applications, report cards, etc.).

4.7 The duties of the Director of Information Technology (IT) shall include, but not be limited to: website oversight; mailing list oversight; renewing domains; email account oversight; protecting the confidentiality of membership data as specified in article 2.8.

4.8 The duties of the Director of Development shall include, but not be limited to: soliciting donations from individuals and organizations; managing donor relations; organizing the annual Liberty Dinner.

Article Five – Committees

5.1 The Board may, by amending this article, create standing committees to assist the Board in fulfilling the goals of the organization. Standing committees may also be dissolved by the same process. In addition, temporary committees, dedicated to a short-term objective and intended to exist for less than six months, may be created by Board resolution. The motion creating each committee shall designate at a committee chairman, who may be, but is not necessarily, a Director. Minutes of all committee meetings shall be kept. Committees may submit motions to the Board for consideration.

5.2 The Ways and Means Committee shall be responsible for raising the funds necessary for the NHLA to fulfill its mission of advancing the cause of individual liberty in New Hampshire. The Director of Development shall be the chair of this committee.

5.3 5.2 The Public Relations Committee shall be responsible for communicating with the media and the public in a manner consistent with the directives set forth by the Board. The Secretary shall be the chair of this committee.

5.4 5.3 The Information Technology Committee shall be responsible for fulfilling the needs of the organization as they relate to technology, as determined by the Board. The Director of IT shall be the chair of this committee.

5.5 5.4 The Research Committee shall be responsible for writing policy briefs and proposed legislation in furtherance of the purpose of the NHLA, for distribution to the media and elected representatives, as directed by the Board. The Director of Research shall be the chair of this committee.

5.6 5.5 The Civic Action Committee shall consist of all members of the Board of Directors and their designees and shall be responsible for finding appropriate NH residents to receive financial assistance through our Civic Action Fund and scheduling charitable events throughout the year to bring non-governmental assistance to NH residents. The Membership Director shall be the chair of this committee.

Article Six – Independent Contractors

6.1 An independent contractor may be engaged to accomplish specific tasks or duties and whose engagement would meet 1099 IRS reporting requirements.

6.2 The board shall have the authority by a simple majority to retain or discharge the services of an independent contractor.

6.3 The board shall develop, and approve by simple majority, a well-defined scope of duties before establishing a position and must advertise the position to collect as many qualified applicants as possible.

6.5 The board shall approve by simple majority any compensation, commissions, expense reimbursement policy, board oversight processes, and/or reporting requirements for the position. These requirements may be defined by the board and negotiated with applicants but must ultimately be approved by the board.

6.6 No independent contractor may be a voting member of the board.

6.7 Independent contractors will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement.

Article Six Seven – Dissolution

6 7.1 Should the NHLA dissolve, all remaining assets shall be distributed in a manner advancing the purpose of the organization.

Article Seven Eight – Amendments

7 8.1 These Bylaws may be amended with the approval of four-fifths of the Directors, provided that at a prior meeting such amendments were approved by a majority of the Directors, and that these amendments were distributed to all Directors for review, and made available to the members on the website and in an email newsletter, in the interim between meetings.

7 8.2 Any Bylaws changes shall take effect at the close of the Board meeting at which they are ratified.

Article Eight Nine – Conflict

8 9.1 If there is any conflict between the provisions of these Bylaws and the Articles of Incorporation of the NHLA, the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation shall govern. Should any of the provisions of portions of these Bylaws be held unenforceable or invalid for any reason, the remaining provisions and portions of these Bylaws shall be unaffected by such holding.

One Person CAN Make a Difference

You might think that being just one person in the 400-member New Hampshire House would be a pretty powerless position, but there were at least two examples this past session where the outcome of an issue was changed by just one or two Reps.

The simplest case was a vote that passed by the slimmest possible margin. The governor had vetoed SB 365, which increased subsidies for biomass plants (thus raising electric rates).  Unfortunately, the spenders in the legislature had their way with a 226-113 vote to override the veto, exactly the necessary 2/3rds.

An even better example on the plus side came on HB 1673. This bill was put in by Rep. Scully. The state and the IRS charge delinquent taxpayers a variable interest rate, currently 6%, but towns are allowed to charge 12% or 18% (depending on circumstances) for delinquent property taxes.  This bill would lower those rates to the state rate.  It was rejected by the House Ways and Means Committee 23 to 0.  It was thus put on the consent calendar, which means it would have no debate.  Such bills are usually impossible to rescue because even if they are taken off the consent calendar, the debate gets put at the end of the day when everyone wants to go home. Reps don’t want to waste their time on something that no one thinks has any merit. In this case, Reps. Burt and Bates got together, removed it from the consent calendar, debated it on the floor, and gave such a masterful speeches that the whole House went their way. The bill then passed the Senate and was signed by the Governor.